Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Foreign Interests Fueling the Attack on Kentucky Property Rights

In this article from the US Energy Information Administration, we find data on how our country's natural gas serves a small, but growing, portion of China’s total energy demand. 

Why is this relevant to those of us fighting pipelines through Kentucky?  It simply shows how foreign demand is adding to the push for natural gas development in the US.  And why we have our work cut-out for us in this "crossroads" state, Kentucky.  This is problematic for a number of reasons:

1.  Increased demand abroad actually weakens US energy independence.
2.  The influx of foreign dollars could easily increase the lobbying budgets of gas companies.
3.  Increased lobbying increases the likelihood that some of "our" government officials --yes, the ones we support through our taxes and votes--may support legislation making it easier for fossil fuel industries seize your property rights through eminent domain abuse.


Excerpt::

"....In 2013, China imported nearly 1.8 Tcf of LNG (trillion cubic feet) and pipeline gas to fill the growing gap between supply and demand. Imported natural gas met 32% of China's demand in 2013, up from 2% in 2006. China is swiftly developing its LNG import capacity in the urban coastal areas and currently has 10 major regasification terminals with 1.7 Tcf/y of capacity. In 2012, China rose to become the third-largest LNG importer in the world, after Japan and South Korea, and in 2013, the country imported 870 billion cubic feet (Bcf) of LNG. Estimates for the first half of 2014 show LNG imports growing at faster levels than in previous years....."

This growing international demand is another reason why it appears that we are stuck with the dangers of fracking for awhile.  Unless, of course, courageous political leaders step forward and appropriately regulate the industry. 
As an aside, here is one thing that I think needs to be addressed in our national discussion about energy options.  Excerpt from the linked article above:

"...China relies heavily on domestic coal (and to a lesser extent oil) to meet rising energy consumption. To reduce air pollution and carbon dioxide emissions, the Chinese government is attempting to replace some of the country's coal and oil use with natural gas...."

Is replacing coal and oil with natural gas as an energy source really the panacea that some claim?  Here is a headline and article from the Guardian from last year that makes this issue less clear than the USEIA implies:

Methane leaks could negate climate benefits of US natural gas boom: report

Reduction in carbon emissions triggered by America's shift from coal to gas is being offset by a sharp rise in methane
So, what IS the answer?  Two words: conservation and renewables.