Thursday, May 8, 2014

First Be Aware, then Be Angry, and then Be Active

The booklet Shalefield Stories is a compilation of personal testimonies of Americans trying to survive amid the fracking industry's mad dash for cash.  Their stories are raw and painful.  When you read it, you'll be angry.  We hope their stories will inspire you to act by contacting representatives at all levels and expressing your concerns.  The home you save may be your own.  Download a copy of Shalefield Stories. Learn more about Friends of the Harmed.

Help Parker County TX, Dimock PA, and Pavillion WY Get

E-blast Call to Action Now Through Sunday April 11!

Water supplies in Parker County TX, Dimock PA, and Pavillion WY are contaminated after fracking occurred in their city limits. The EPA come in and give them glimmer of hope but then dropped the investigation. Citizens are fighting back and need your help. Tell Administrator McCarthy to reopen the investigations. Feel free to call once, or twice, even three times. Let’s keep those phones ringing off the hook!  To make it easy, we have a quick script to use if you choose (See Below:)

Please Call Toll Free: 888-661-3342

Leave your message.  Something like this:  "Hi, My name is _____, and I'm calling to ask EPA Administrator McCarthy to reopen the investigations in Parker County TX, Dimock PA, and Pavillion WY. I'm saddened that the EPA has chosen to abandon these communities, and not protect them from the Oil and Gas industry. Your own scientists have said that their water was possibly contaminated by Fracking, yet you continue to do nothing. Please reopen the investigations!"

Williams Company "Incidents" Just Keep Coming Don't They?

The would-be builders of the Bluegrass hazardous liquids pipeline just seem to keep having "incident" after "incident."  Some make the news, but it is possible that many more don't.  Why?  The answer may surprise you:

"Unless somebody dies or is injured, it’s not a reportable incident, says the federal agency in charge of investigating fracked methane pipeline safety."  Read more.

Further, "unless there was a loss of more than $50,000 in product, it’s not even a reportable incident, just an “abnormal operating condition,” according to what PHMSA said about Suavie Island, Oregon."  Read more.

This is especially troubling when we know that existing technology is far from perfect and detects only 5% of the nation's pipeline spills
and that members of the public or first responders were more likely to detect leaks than the "state of the art" detection equipment used by pipeline companies.

We've written about the company's problematic history, and problems continue, seemingly without significant penalty:

  • Williams fire and explosion near Plymouth, WA 2014-03-31 - A two-mile evacuation ratio around a Williams fracked methane facility in Oregon, and once again a state agency investigates while federal PHMSA does nothing, same near Plymouth, WA, as on Sauvie Island, OR. 
  • Williams Oak Grove explosion in Marshall County, WV 2014-04-05 - In which Williams admits [the] subsidence can cause a gas pipeline explosion. So does an even larger (36-inch vs. 12-inch) pipeline through the fragile karst sinkhole-prone limestone of the Floridan Aquifer for the Sabal Trail pipeline connected to Williams’ Transco sound like a good idea? Especially considering pipeline companies aren’t held accountable for the expense of their explosions, leaving local and state governments to pick up the tab?
  • Williams explosion and fire, Opal, WY 2014-04-23 - Fourth major incident this year for Williams, this time in Wyoming. Yet again locals and their local and state governments were left to pick up the tab, and the cause is still “under investigation.” 

Yes, We Can Stop the Fracking Madness: Dryden Fights Back


"The industry kept saying: 'We have the power; you have none. We are coming. Get out of the way or leave,'" says Joanne Cipolla-Dennis, recalling what happened when the oil and gas industry came to her town of Dryden, NY.

But Joanne and her neighbors came up with a plan. Watch the true story of people who discovered their shared strength and turned the tables on a powerful industry.

As fracking bears down on 31 states across the country, this story offers hope and important lessons for communities trying to protect themselves.

Please help us spread the word from coast to coast—and get people the information they need to win the fight against fracking.


Monday, May 5, 2014

Not to be Missed! Join us for the Potluck in the Path


Pipeline Delayed - Now What?

I was out of state last week when I heard the news about the Bluegrass Pipeline being indefinitely delayed.  Naturally, it was an exciting day for our group with emails flying back and forth, texts, and speculation as to what it all meant.  Most of us feel a sense of cautious optimism.  However, we also feel that it is most important to continue our efforts to lobby for citizens' land rights through strengthening Kentucky's eminent domain laws.

While we are naturally pleased that our families and homes will be safe for the next couple of years, we also know the battle is far from over.  We intend to focus our efforts on eminent domain and building meaningful, sustainable communities with the resilience to resist the spread of fracking.

We will continue to move forward with these initiatives and invite you to stay with us as we plan and implement strategies across the state.